Are Carbonated Drinks Bad for You?

sparklingwater
A lot of people like carbonated drinks over flat drinks, but are these hurting our teeth? Dr. Garrett looks into which drinks are bad and which ones are safe.

Any drink that has sugar or acid in them will be bad for your teeth. Sodas, sports drinks, flavored water, and energy drinks usually contain sugar or a sugar substitute. When you drink these beverages, the sugar will stick to your teeth and the bacteria in your mouth will feed on the sugar and decay develops as a result. Then when you add carbonation to the beverages, the acidity level goes up to close to the acidity in your stomach which desolves food. This is a double whammy, which can lead to more rapid destruction of your teeth.

But what about just plain carbonated water? Carbonation results in the formation of carbonic acid, which gives plain carbonated water its distinctive flavor, but neither carbonation nor carbonic acid seem to have a significant effect on tooth enamel erosion. According to a 2001 study published in the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, “sparkling mineral waters showed slightly greater dissolution than still waters, but levels remained low and were of the order of one hundred times less than the comparator soft drinks.”2 This is not true of flavored soda water, by the way. The flavoring agents make the soda water significantly more acidic and these flavored seltzers could contribute to dental erosion.   If you’re swilling multiple sugary drings every day, you’re going to have eroded tooth enamel, cavities, and a whopping dentist’s bill, but don’t fault the carbonation in sparkling water, it’s not bad for you.

 

The best drink for your teeth is regular tap water! If you want the fizz, go ahead and have some plain carbonated water or add your natural flavoring. But stay away from sodas and energy drinks full of sugar. Unless you really like coming to see us, then we can fix all of those terrible cavities 🙂

Call us today to schedule a checkup so Dr Garrett can make sure those sugary drinks haven’t damaged your teeth! 901-347-3527

 

1 .Take Part 07/31/2013

2. Monica Reinagel, MS, LD/N, CNS,Nutrition DivaDecember 28, 2010