Yes, You Can Have Some of the Halloween Candy

 

Halloween is just around the corner, and although candy consumption is almost unavoidable this time of year, the Academy of General Dentistry(AGD) wants parents and children to know that there are both good and bad candy options, both of which may find their way into children’s trick-or-treat bags this fall.

Of course, dentists do not advocate that anyone eat large amounts of sugary treats, but it is that time of year, so we want to clarify which treats are better for their teeth and which ones may increase the risk of developing cavities.

 Worst:

 Chewy/sticky sweets, such as gummy candies, taffy, and even dried fruit can be difficult for children and adults to resist, and even more difficult to remove from teeth. These candies get stuck in grooves of teeth and are harder for saliva to wash out.

Sour candies are highly acidic and can break down tooth enamel quickly. The good news: Saliva slowly helps to restore the natural balance of the acid in the mouth.

Sugary snacks, including candy corn, cookies, and cake, all contain high amounts of sugar, which can cause tooth decay.

Best:

 Sugar-free lollipops and hard candies stimulate saliva, which can help prevent dry mouth and prevent cavities.

Sugar-free gum can actually prevent cavities as it not only dislodges food particles from between the teeth but also increases saliva—which works to neutralize the acids of the mouth and prevent tooth decay.

Dark chocolate and its antioxidants, according to some studies, can be good for the heart and may even lower blood pressure.

By closely monitoring intake, we can prevent cavities and still enjoy good treats.

Candy Buy Back 2015Join us on Monday, November 2nd from 4pm-7pm for our Annual Halloween Candy Buy Back!

We will give kids $1 per pound of candy up to $5

We will have a balloon artist, face painting, crafts, and a raffle drawings.

We even have prizes for parents too!